March 8, 2011, Mr. José Ricardo Taveras Blanco was installed as Director of the Department for Migration in the Dominican Republic. He is the secretary general of the Hjalmarson Foundation’s sister party in the Dominican Republic.

Mr. Taveras Blanco is the Secretary General of Fuerza Nacional Progresista (FNP), sister party of the Jarl Hjalmarson Foundation in the Dominican Republic. He has been MP of FNP during two periods (2002-2006 and 2006-2010) though failing to be reelected due to fraud in the past elections in May 2010. Taveras Blanco has a long experience as a politician and as a lawyer and he is Vice-President of the regional organization Unión de Partidos Latinoamericanos (UPLA), within the International Democrat Union. Mr. Taveras Blanco visited Sweden as a guest of the JHS and as an observer in the past elections in Sweden together with prominent politicians from several countries. He participated in a special election watch program arranged by the Foundation which included seminars, conferences and bilateral meetings with politicians and institutions.

 

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Cuba – No Less Oppressive

August 12th, 2010   Articles | Cuba

Earlier this month the Castro regime, after mediation by the Catholic Church, announced that it would release 52 political prisoners and “allow them” to leave the island. This is a remarkable u-turn by the regime, since Cuba so far denied having any political prisoners at all.

The release and exile of political prisoners didn’t happen because the Castro regime decided to soften its stance. In particular since the untimely death in February of hunger striking political prisoner Orlando Zapata Tamayo, recognized by Amnesty International as a prisoner of conscience, Cuba has come under intense and unprecedented international scrutiny. A recent hunger strike by Guillermo Farinas – for the more humane treatment and immediate release of the most ill political prisoners – increased the pressure on the regime after he was hospitalized in critical condition. (more…)

On March 5-8, The Jarl Hjalmarson Foundation and Unión de Partidos Latinoamericanos (UPLA) held two parallel conferences about democracy for youth and women in San Salvador. The conferences received a lot of attention from Latin-American newspapers and agencies.

Eva Gustavsson, Managing Director of JHS, has been frequently quoted in the media with a comment on the political developments in the region: “For the last two years everybody when looking at Latinamerica watched what was happening with the governments of Bolivia and Venezuela, and Michelle Bachelet in Chile who had a very clear Socialist tendency. All that is now changing. We are seeing the reaction of the people that became fed up each time the government moved further to the left and with a clear dictatorial tendency”.

Further reading:
Merco Press (Uruguay)
Latam conservative parties encouraged with recent electoral victories

El Universal (Venezuela)
Partidos de derecha advierten retroceso de izquierda en Latinoamérica

Excelsior (Mexico)
Derecha toma el poder AL

La Prensa (Honduras)
Influencia chavista pierde fuerza en Latinoamérica

Estadao (Brazil)
Direita prevê retrocesso da esquerda na América Latina

Elsalvador.com (El Salvador)
UPLA: La influencia chavista pierde fuerza

The political situation in Argentina has been turbulent in the last year. In the legislative elections of June 2009, the opposition won majority in the House of Representatives and has over the last year been characterized by president Cristina Kirchner’s attempt to remain in power. When visiting Sweden in March, Carolina Poli Palazzo, Advisor to an Argentinian local politician described an Argentina which has been subject to political misgovernment but which is finally on its way back – if the opposition manages to build a stable coalition.


The presidential form of government in Argentina not only results in a different role and impact of the legislative branch but also in few coalitions formed between parties compared to the Swedish form of government. As legislative elections are mid term elections, when majorities are changed in both chambers it doesn’t change the government whatsoever.

The two-party structure that has been predominant in the last sixty years came to an end in the 2001 political and economic crisis. Today, the system is largely based on four main parties (which have subdivisions and, in some cases, fragile alliances). This system has a direct impact on the National Congress and is likely to have an impact on the 2011 presidential elections. (more…)

On December 13 last year, 8.2 million people voted in the Presidential election in Chile. None of the candidates managed to receive a majority of the votes. The Candidates who received the most votes; Sebastian Piñera (44 percent) and Eduardo Frei (29 percent), were up for a second election on January 17, 2010. Piñera won with 51.6 percent against Freis, who received 48.4 percent.

On December 13 last year, 8.2 million voted in the Presidential election in Chile. None of the candidates managed to receive a majority of the votes. The Candidates who received the most votes; Sebastian Piñera (44 percent) and Eduardo Frei (29 percent), were up for a second election on January 17, 2010. Piñera won with 51.6 percent against Freis, who received 48.4 percent.

The newly elected president will not take office until March 11, due to the current holiday season in Chile. But the preparations for the government’s upcoming work have already started. An important part of the president’s power in Chile is the ability to propose legislation, which is one of the reasons why the new administration wants to prepare as much as possible before coming into power. (more…)