Week 38, September 6 – 12

September 12th, 2011   Theme: Belarus

Mikalaj Statkievic, former presidential candidate who was sentenced to six years of imprisonment within the criminal case of “mass riots”, is sent to hospital. Uladzimir Niaklajeu, leader of Tell the Truth civil campaign and former presidential candidate, faces additional restrictions

September 6

Police officers are carrying out a search at the home of Ales Kalita, member of the Belarusian Popular Front Party. Earlier Ales Kalita had been interrogated in regards to the criminal case initiated against him and two other BPF Party members, Maksim Hubarevic and Siarzuk Siemianiuk, for “beating a guard.”

Four civil activists are arrested by the Police on Jubilejnaja Street in Homiel when collecting signatures for a People’s Assembly in Homiel on October 8, in order to discuss the political and economical situation and set forth proposals and demands to the authorities. The activists are taken to the Police station for an interrogation by the head of the law and order department of the Cyhunacny District Police Office of Homiel. The activists are told that they are arrested because of a complaint put forward by one of the signers, that the activists collected signatures in an incorrect way.

September 7

Mikalaj Statkievic, former presidential candidate who was sentenced to six years of imprisonment within the criminal case of “mass riots”, is sent to hospital after his hand was seriously injured while serving his prison time. The convicted politician has recently been working at a lumber mill. His wife says that relatives haven’t heard from him since August 4.

The Horki District Court sentences Ivan Syla, famous oppositional activist from the youth organisation Young Front, to 20 days of imprisonment for participating in a picket close to the prison where the Young Front leader Zmicier Daskievic is serving a two-year term. He is being subject to cruel and degrading treatment by the prison administration. The judge found Ivan Syla guilty of participation in an unauthorised action and insubordination to the police and sentenced him to ten days of jail for each of these “violations”.

 

September 8

Vital Huliak, civil activist in the town of Vaukavysk, is called to the Vaukavysk District Court. According to the information he received, he will stand before the Court for “picketing with the aim to call to the People’s Assembly appointed on October 8, 2011”. According to the police report the activist is guilty of handing out leaflets. Vital Huliak was arrested on August 19. At first the police just took statements from the detainee and let him go. Later they a violation report was filed under Article 23.34, part 3.

 

September 9

Hienadz Fiadynic, chairman of the Independent Trade Union of Radio Electronic Industry is arrested by the Salihorsk road police.

Hienadz Fiadynic was on his way to a meeting with Salihorsk residents, but was taken to the Salihorsk District Police Department. The police confiscated leaflets with economic demands and invitations to the People’s Assembly that was planned to be held on October 8.

Uladzimir Niaklajeu, leader of Tell the Truth civil campaign and former presidential candidate, faces additional restrictions imposed by the Leninski District Court in Minsk. The Court decides that he may not organise or participate in rallies, demonstrations, pickets and other mass events. He cannot leave Minsk without written permission of the law enforcement bodies and leave Belarus until expiration of the sentence. Uladzimir Niaklajeu must register in the law enforcement bodies in his place of residence once a week and be at home from 8:00 pm until 6:00 am the next day.

 

September 10

Vital Huliak, civil activist in the town of Vaukavysk, is found guilty and fined 1,050,000 Belarusian roubles (about 140€). The judge considered his actions as unauthorised picketing.

September 12

KGB officers in Mahilou visit relatives of Uladzimir Stankievic, political refugee and activist of the Social-Democratic Party who is currently living in exile in Czech Republic. The KGB wants to know where Uladzimir Stankievic is and what he is doing. Afterwards, one of Uladzimir Stankievic’s relatives was threatened by KGB that problems at work will occur if he doesn’t cooperate with the security service.

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